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Reasons of Inadmissibility for Entering the US

There are certain reasons of inadmissibility that leads a person ineligible for a visa or entry into the United States. The following is a list of some of the most common grounds for inadmissibility. Keep reading to learn more about these grounds of inadmissibility and what you can do if you are affected by them.

List of Reasons of Inadmissibility for Entering the US

There are many reasons why a person may be found inadmissible in the United States. The following is a list of grounds for inadmissibility:

Health-RelatedGrounds

Aperson may be inadmissible to the United States if they have a communicable disease that poses a public health threat, or if they have a physical or mental condition that could pose a danger to themselves or others.


Criminal History

A person with a criminal history may be inadmissible to the United States if their crime is considered an aggravated felony, if they have been convicted of certain drug offenses, or if they have been convicted of certain crimes involving moral turpitude.

Security Risk

A person may be inadmissible to the United States if they are deemed to be a security risk. This includes persons who are members of terrorist organizations, persons who have engaged in espionage or sabotage, and persons who have committed war crimes.

Public Charge

A person may be inadmissible to the United States if they are likely to become a public charge, meaning they are likely to rely on government assistance for their basic needs.

Unlawful Presence

A person may be inadmissible to the United States if they have unlawfully remained in the country for more than six months after their visa has expired, or if they have been previously deported from the United States. 

What are the Consequences of being found Inadmissible in the United States?

If you are found to be inadmissible to the United States, you may be denied entry into the country. You may also be placed in removal proceedings, where you will be required to appear before an immigration judge. If the judge finds that you are inadmissible, you may be ordered to leave the United States.

How can I Overcome Inadmissibility?

If you are inadmissible to the United States, it means that you are unable to enter the country. There are many reasons why someone may be inadmissible, including health concerns, criminal history, or security risks. If you are inadmissible, you may be able to overcome this status by applying for a waiver.

A waiver is an official document that allows someone inadmissible to enter the United States. To get a waiver, you must first prove that you meet the criteria for eligibility. Once you have done this, you can submit your application to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you will be interviewed by a consular officer. If your application is approved, you will be granted a waiver and allowed to enter the United States.

There are many different types of waivers, each with specific requirements. The most common waiver is the I-601A provisional waiver, which allows certain immediate relatives of U.S. citizens to apply for a green card without having to leave the United States first.

Other waivers may be available if you are inadmissible due to:

  • unlawful presence in the United States
  • prior removals from the United States
  • criminal convictions
  • certain health-related grounds
  • falsifying documents or providing false information to immigration authorities

What are the Consequences of being found Inadmissible in the United States?

If you are found to be inadmissible to the United States, you may be denied entry into the country. You may also be placed in removal proceedings, where you will be required to appear before an immigration judge. If the judge finds that you are inadmissible, you may be ordered to leave the United States.